Stretcher-Bearers Transport a Casualty to a U.S. Air Force Helicopter, Korea, 22 June 1952.
National Archives of Canada (PA-128851, photo by Paul E. Tomelin).

Stretcher-Bearers Transport a Casualty to a U.S. Air Force Helicopter, Korea, 22 June 1952.

The wounded soldier, a member of the 2nd Battalion, R.C.R., was then flown to No. 8055 M.A.S.H. for treatment.

Canadian soldiers serving in Korea were enrolled for 18 months, 12 of which were to be served in Korea. In October and November 1951, at which time Canadian soldiers were nearing the end of their contracted tours, Canada began to rotate its troops. The 1st Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (1 PPCLI) was sent to the front lines to replace its affiliated battalion, 2 PPCLI. In early spring 1952, 1RCR and 1 R22eR similarly replaced 2 RCR and 2 R22eR.

During the changeover period, the Chinese launched another counterattack. The Canadians and the rest of the UN forces were able to hold their positions roughly along the 38th parallel (the so-called Jamestown Line). This Chinese offensive, however, marked the final stage of full-scale war between the opposing armies.

Preparing for a Night Patrol, Korea, 21 June 1952.
National Archives of Canada (PA-129740, photo by Paul E. Tomelin).

Preparing for a Night Patrol, Korea, 21 June 1952.

Major Don Holmes of "Charlie" Company, 1st Battalion, R.C.R., checks signal equipment. From left to right: Major Holmes, Private Morris, and Private Drinkwater.

From the winter of 1951-1952 onward, no major battles or offensives took place. A war of attrition ensued in which operations were limited to sporadic raiding and constant patrolling. Although the outcome of the war was now in the hands of the negotiators, the UN force was still at peril. Many battle casualties were recorded in this period despite the changed nature of the war.

In late 1952 and early 1953, the third contingents (consisting of 3 PPCLI, 3 RCR, and 3 R22eR) replaced the 1st battalions.

When peace was finally negotiated, a fourth Canadian contingent was en route to join the Canadian Brigade in Korea. Like the battalions raised for the first NATO contingent, 27 CIBG, this contingent was comprised of composite battalions raised from the militia. When these new battalions arrived in Korea, they became the 2nd battalions of the Queen's Own Rifles, The Black Watch, and the Canadian Guards.

 

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